Tag Archives: Spirituality

Lost in Translation

X. ran around today shouting ‘die, die, die!’.  He did it at the store.  He did it on the driveway for our entire neighborhood.  He did it for anyone we ran into.  This made me want to ostrich very badly.  I was so embarrassed.  As I shushed him and tried to express how inappropriate this was, my head was filled with thoughts like ‘Where did he learn this word?’ and ‘Why is he running around shouting die, die, die!’.  It was not a good scene.

As the day progressed and he continued to utter death threats I just began to pray that eventually he would grow bored of this fun new word and move on.   When his speech therapist arrived for our last appointment of the year I had almost forgotten the events of the morning until he began doing it again.  And that’s when it hit me, he wasn’t saying ‘die’ he was saying ‘dive’.  When my little boy says the word dive it sounds like die because he has not yet mastered the v sound.

Palm to forehead.   Assume ostrich position. 

The speech therapist and I had a good laugh about this.  And it really made me wonder how much in our lives gets lost in translation.  How often do we just not get it?

As I read through the Prophets I have to assume this happens more often than not.  The people of Israel cry out to God and wonder why God’s upset when it’s been expressed repeatedly by the prophets.  The thing is, the Israelites don’t want to hear or are unable to hear.  The message is confused and puzzling to them.  They need to sift through it and find out what God is trying to say.

I think this happens to us in the church today as well.  When we deal with our desires and plans we often shove God off to the side and plan on using him if he is needed.  There is a sense that if we make enough plans and prepare enough events eventually things will work out for us.  If it doesn’t then we’re lost and confused.  We wonder why things aren’t happening.  We wonder why God isn’t answering our prayers.

Unfortunately for us, God likely is answering our prayers.  The problem is like that we don’t like the answer or we don’t understand it.  We have a hard time with the translation.  We have a hard time hearing what God wants us to do.  This is something we need to work on.  We need to start listening and discern the message God is sending us.  We need to begin the process of translation.

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Saturday afternoon

Over the last month weekends we spent in celebration.  I went to my brother and sister’s university graduation in Sault Ste. Marie, I attended a Bridal Shower, a Bachelorette Party and managed to squeeze in a birthday party for my husband. We’ve been busy.  This weekend I’ve been able to relax a little.  It’s been nice.

I’ve not been able to relax too much however as I do have to work tomorrow. That being said I’ve never been a person to allow a little work to ruin a beautiful afternoon.  I took my laptop out on the patio and sat in my backyard oasis while I did some editing.  It was heaven.

As I sat out on the back deck, enjoying the sunshine and sipping on some Iced Pomegranate Green Tea that my husband brought me I started thinking about how much work went into creating this lovely environment.   Over the years we’ve added to the garden, installed a retractable awning, hung baskets and fought against a particularly stubborn colony of carpenter bees.  We’ve cleaned and scrubbed and called for help when it was needed.  A backyard garden is not something that can be ignored.

That’s the way of things, isn’t it?  You cannot ignore something and expect it to remain perfect and functional.  Our garden, like our home needs maintenance and care. We must tend to things in order to keep things working the way we would like.

As maintenance is required in homes and gardens, so it is required in faith.  In order for us to function well we need to perform constant maintenance.  We need to fill ourselves with God’s truth by reading, discussing and examining scriptures. We must pray and open ourselves to a relationship with God.  It’s not easy, sometimes it’s work but it’s incredibly rewarding.

For the past 55 days I’ve been getting up around 6 to read the Bible and pray. Some mornings are more productive than others.  Some days I read more than I pray and other days it’s the exact opposite.  There is but one constant, God. There is one thing that matters, my relationship with God.  This personal time, this private time with God was not something I had allowed for myself on a regular basis before.  Often times my private reflection time was overwhelmed by Sunday preparation.  I wasn’t a diligent as I should have been about personal reflection.  I had forgotten to do regular maintenance and was in jeopardy of breaking down completely.

I have discovered much about myself these past 55 days.  I love the quiet time in the morning and am grateful for a chance to give thanks and embrace the stillness before the day begins.  In adding this activity to my already busy life I’ve actually found more time.  I’ve discovered peace.  I’ve shifted my priorities.  I’ve embraced a life with fewer worries and have found that going with God is a heck of a lot easier than fighting him.  It’s been wonderful, challenging and incredibly rewarding.  Much like tending a garden I’ve watched my own faith grow and change.

Maintaining our faith requires work and this is something we in ministry often forget.  We think we’re doing maintenance when really we’re helping others on their journey.  In order for us to function well we need to set aside time for spiritual development and reflection.  I think the same can be said for those sitting in the pews.  It’s easy to attend church on Sunday and expect the minister to do the work for us.  We want to come into a pretty garden, not do the work to help create it.   Faith is work.  Faith requires some effort.

This morning I ran across a passage that says it all:

“…In returning and rest you shall be saved; in quietness and in trust shall be your strength.”  Isaiah 30:15

We need to make time in our busy lives for God.  We must return to God’s presence frequently to find strength and peace.  In that quiet time we will discover who we are.  In that quiet time we will find God.

How will you find your quiet this week?
How will you meet God?

Worrying gets us nowhere.

I feel like I write about this all the time but it seems like all we do as a Church is worry and let’s face it, worrying gets us nowhere.

Think about it.  When in your life has worry actually accomplished anything?  In my life worrying never accomplishes anything.  I can worry all I want but worry doesn’t change the outcome.  All worrying does is cause anxiety and waste energy.
When the Church worries the same thing is true.

The Church right now is living in a state of anxiety and we are wasting energy discussing and debating all of our worries for the future.  Sinking into the worry and allowing it to consume us has not propelled us forward.  It has prevented us from visioning or making plans because we are worried of what might happen and we’re not focused on what is happening.

In my reading this morning I ran across this statement in 1 Chronicles 28:20, where David tells his son Solomon not to worry but instead to “…Be strong and of good courage, and act.  Do not be afraid or dismayed; for the Lord my God is with you…”  What I loved about this was that David reminds Solomon to act.  Not to get caught up in other things but to be strong, of good courage and act.  When we worry we fail to act.  When we worry we think about what might happen but we don’t act in the present.

It’s time to act.  To be the Church.  To stop worrying about the future and start thinking about the present.   It’s a tough time to be the Church.  Decisions need to be made.  Choices are going to be difficult.  Things must change.  All of that is hard to do but worrying about outcomes and wondering what’s going to happen doesn’t make it any less necessary.

I know it’s difficult.  We really don’t know where we are going but we aren’t the first people to have no clue what lay ahead.  The Israelites had to trust that God would lead them.  The Apostles waited in faith for the Holy Spirit to arrive.  Countless others have waited on God and now it’s our turn.  We are in a time of transition but as David reminded his son when he passed the torch “…the Lord my God is with you…”.  We aren’t alone in this.  God is with us.

When we give in to worry we cease relying on God.  We must have faith.  We have to trust that God is leading us somewhere.

Worrying gets us nowhere.

As David reminded Solomon, God is with us and we must act.
God is indeed with us. Are you ready for action?
How are you going to let go of worry?

Here it is…

When I announced the I was going through Leviticus I knew that someone would want to know my stance on Homosexuality and Jesus.  I didn’t expect it to come quite so fast but thanks Robert for prompting me to share.

Here’s it is:

God doesn’t make mistakes.  God makes people.  Some people are gay, some are straight and I think God loves everyone.  Some of you might wonder why I would say this.  You might think I’m a horrible Christian for believing this but here me out.  I don’t think God ever intended for us to hate gay people and I’m fairly certain as a church we’ve got it wrong.

The first thing I thought when I got to Leviticus 18:22 was “well I guess it’s ok to be a Lesbian”.  There’s no mention of women/women relationships and I guess that’s probably due to the fact that women were not really citizens.  I’m not sure why we got hung up on this line really.  It’s one line in a bunch of lines that we don’t really follow anymore.  Think about it for a moment

Truthfully there’s a lot more said about menstruation, semen emissions and sleeping with other animals then there is about homosexuality.

I do not know why one rule is held up over these others.  I do not understand why  Christians who follow Jesus think it’s okay to hate others.  Jesus spoke love into the world.  Jesus lived love in the world.  Jesus showed us how much God loved us and tried to demonstrate how we should live.

When asked which were the most important parts of the law Jesus said “‘…Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.” {Matthew 22:37-40 NIV}

We need to love our neighbor.  We need to love them.  This is what Jesus taught us to do.  We are called to love, serve and speak God into the world.  We need to love.

I love gay people.
I love you too.
I try to love everyone.
That’s what Jesus taught me to do.

Jonah.

These crazy dreams have got to stop.

Last night I woke up at 4 am after having another crazy dream.  This time I was sitting at a table with quite a few people discussing Jonah.  As we were going over the text a teenager came up to me at the table and asked me why Jonah was important.  I broke away from the group and started speaking with him.  I went over all the typical things {like how Jonah didn’t want to do it, ran from God, God used him anyways etc…} and we even talked about how Jonah pouted at the end of the text so it just goes to show that even if you don’t want to do it and don’t like doing it, sometimes you wind up working for God anyways.  Then the guy turns to me and says “I don’t get it”.  So I start again…and again…and again.

Thank heavens I woke up.

The last last time I had a series of vivid spiritual dreams I wound up in seminary.  I really hope dream number three doesn’t come or I’ll have to piece together what Hello Kitty and Jonah have to do with whatever else is coming…

Wonder Bread Jesus

Communion in these parts tends to be celebrated with Wonder Bread and a bitter  sweet wine (or if you’re lucky a grape cocktail).  Jesus is cubed and placed on nice trays.  The liquid is poured into tiny cups.  It’s a process.  It’s a system.  It’s how it’s always been done.

The problem I have with this is that Jesus is not sweet wine, grape cocktail or Wonder Bread to me.  Jesus does not leave a bitter taste in your mouth.  Jesus is not foam that dissolves the instant it is placed on your tongue.  Jesus is an artisan bread.  Jesus is special vintage wine or Welch’s grape juice.  Jesus is the best of the best.  Jesus is texture.  Jesus is body.  Jesus is.

Our Wonder Bread Jesus is troubling.  Our desire to cut and cube, to keep things orderly, to have Jesus cut perfectly so we all get the same experience.  Jesus is so much more than this.  Jesus is the misshapen loaf that was lovingly created in the early morning by a baker who lives for baking.  The bread that is crafted for nourishment and enjoyment.  Each piece is filled with body and texture that we savor.  This bread is meant to be ripped apart and devoured with your hands while still hot. Like this bread, Jesus is filled with life and soul.  Jesus is an experience you remember. Jesus is something you want to experience over and over again.

How many of us would miss Wonder Bread Jesus?

Lately I’ve begun to wonder this.  This tradition and ritual seems lost on some people.  As I stand behind the table reciting the words that have been passed down for generations, I hear the conversations that take place in the sanctuary.  I also hear phones clicking and people moving.  As I move through the experience I have to wonder if they would miss this moment if it weren’t happening?  Do they understand what we are doing?  Are they really connected in the communion of the body of Christ?  Do they even know what that phrase means?

I find myself imagining a different way.  I drift towards an image of family style communion held around a table or two.  Where people gather together in a room or in a hall and celebrate the feast of our Lord as a true feast.  What if loaves were passed and cut and enjoyed.  What if jugs of wine and juice were found on tables and people filled their cups and celebrated community.  The feast would be blessed.  The Lord would be invited into the gathering.  It would be a celebration.  There would be a time of sharing so that people would know what this moment was about.  They would learn what the ritual truly means.  They would become part of the experience.  It would be a living moment of faith.  I think we need to work towards more living moments of faith.

Would you miss the Wonder Bread Jesus?